20th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect
August 31 - September 2, 2016  Grand Hyatt Washington  Washington DC

Conference Overview

The Children’s Bureau’s Office on Child Abuse and Neglect (CB/OCAN) is committed to offering a program featuring a cadre of compelling and thought-provoking speakers. We welcome the submission of abstracts that address a wide range of topics of interest and importance to those engaged in promoting the well-being of children and families. We are interested in proposals representing a diversity of backgrounds, communities and perspectives including: urban, suburban, and rural areas; racial and ethnically diverse populations; and involvement at the national, state, and local levels.

The 20th NCCAN is placing a premium on sessions that represent an array of voices and are responsive to principles of adult learning. CB/OCAN strongly encourages the participation of consumers, parents, and other community partners as session presenters.

Theme

The conference theme, Building Community, Building Hope, acknowledges the tremendous power in communities to solve the problem of child abuse and neglect, and reflects our goal of providing a multidisciplinary forum to foster conversations about what we as a society can—and should—do to ensure children grow up to achieve their full potential, free from abuse and neglect. As we gather together to build new knowledge, skills and abilities, we will be strengthening our sense of community and renewing our shared sense of hope for achieving improved outcome for our nation’s children.

Core Topic Areas

Listed below are the five core topic areas for the 20th NCCAN. Each includes examples of the types of subject matter that support these topics. Given the diverse professional backgrounds, experience and interests of expected Conference participants, these examples are meant to be illustrative only

Regardless of the specific content to be offered, all sessions will include specific learning objectives to assist Conference participants in choosing the learning opportunities that best help them achieve their professional development goals.

The five core topic areas are:

  • 1
    PROMOTING CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING: EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES AT ALL LEVELS
    • Effective multi-disciplinary strategies are needed at all levels, including: individual, relationship, community and societal.
    • For example, topics in this area could include: approaches, policies, strategies, programs and practices related to applying a public health approach to preventing and addressing child maltreatment; being strengths-based; partnering with families throughout engagement and involvement; shifting funding, policies and systems toward prevention; preserving family relationships and promoting healing; and building a new vision that incorporates family well-being into the work.
  • 2
    SHAPING THE WORKFORCE: STRONG, CAPABLE, AND WELL-SUPPORTED TEAMS
    • Effective multi-disciplinary strategies are needed at all levels, including: individual, relationship, community and societal.
    • Topics in this area could include approaches, policies, strategies, programs and practices that provide solutions and skill building opportunities related to issues such as creating and operating in trauma-informed systems; addressing secondary trauma; coaching vs. managing; reflective supervision; engaging the workforce in using data to explore challenges and ensure continuous quality improvement; and improving decision-making skills to ensure more effective assessments and engagement techniques.
  • 3
    BUILDING ON STRENGTHS: ENGAGEMENT IN EFFECTIVE, SUPPORTIVE, AND INFORMED SYSTEMS
    • Building on strengths found in individuals, families, communities is a critical part of changing systems to better support child and family well-being.
    • Topics in this area could include approaches, policies, strategies, programs and practices that help systems change to become more trauma-informed; using data to strengthen systems; increasing family ownership of decisions and plans; better use of assessments to determine service need, quality and effectiveness; services designed from the consumer’s point of view; building resilience; relying on best practices and evidence-based programs; and creating and sustaining more supportive organizational cultures.
  • 4
    LEVERAGING COMMUNITY ASSETS: UNDERSTANDING CONTEXT AND BUILDING RESPONSIVE PROGRAMS AND PRACTICES
    • Effective, high-functioning child welfare and child maltreatment prevention program and practices rely on deep knowledge and understanding of the people and communities served, and the ability to adapt to and leverage changes in the environment.
    • Topics in this area could include approaches, policies, strategies, programs and practices related to addressing changes in family structure and mobility and responding to increased diversity, multiculturalism, and immigration; ensuring equity; implementing multi-generational strategies; mobilizing communities; using technology and social media; amplifying unheard voices, addressing historical/intergenerational trauma, and identifying community-level protective factors.
  • 5
    PARTNERING FOR IMPACT: EFFECTIVE WORK ACROSS SYSTEMS AND DISCIPLINES TO BREAKDOWN SILOS
    • Advancing the well-being of children and families requires overcoming barriers to working across silos, systems and disciplines, especially if we are to effectively serve families with multiple, complex needs.
    • Topics in this area could include approaches, policies, strategies, programs and practices related to developing powerful and meaningful partnerships to address multiple and complex needs of families; reframing neglect; addressing the intersections among child maltreatment, substance abuse, domestic violence, poverty, and housing; understanding the impact of toxic stress on development; identifying shared values and desired outcomes; adopting a common language; sharing data and technology; engaging in shared decision making; utilizing evidence-informed and evidence-based programs; strengthening leadership skills; creating and nurturing champions; promoting collective impact; and social impact financing.